Information Center: Bioko Island, 2004

3 results

Results

A P Davis; E Flgueiredo
September 18, 2004

A detailed checklist of the Rubiaceae (coffee family) occurring naturally on the islands of Bioko and Annobon (Equatorial Guinea, Gulf of Guinea) is presented, based on herbarium collections deposited in the herbaria of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and The Natural History Museum, London. The checklist comprises 58 genera and 147 species, including six new generic records and 26 new infrageneric records. The total number of native Rubiaceae species occurring in Bioko is 139; three entities do not have formal names and probably represent new taxa. In Annobon there are 12 native genera and 13 indigenous species of Rubiaceae. The conservation status of two endemic species is assessed using IUCN criteria and it is proposed that they are considered Vulnerable.

J Cano, P J Berzosa, J Roche, J M Rubio, E Moyano, A Guerra-Neira, H Brochero, M Mico, M Edu, and A Benito
March 7, 2004

The current study was performed on the Bioko Island (Equatorial Guinea) with the aim of establishing a rapid assessment technique for mapping malaria risk and measuring vector densities. Human bait collection, tent traps, light traps, indoor resting collection, and window exit traps were used to collect Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles funestus, the two anopheline species involved in malaria transmission in this island. Capture data were used to compare differences in the behavior and vectorial capacity of An. gambiae s.s. and An. funestus. Differences in the two species of mosquitoes were found in relation to the season and trapping methods used. Entomological inoculation rates (EIR) for Plasmodium falciparum were calculated using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test with individual anopheline mosquitoes from human bait collections in two villages during the dry and rainy seasons. P. falciparum sporozoites were detected from both dissected heads/thorax and abdomens of both species.

J P Gonzalez Kirchner
April 8, 2004

The Press's guenon (Cercopithecus preussi) is considered to be one of the most threatened African primates. There is little information on the ecology and status of this primate on Bioko island, where it is found in the form of an endemic subspecies. This article discusses the habitat preferences and threats to survival for this primate.

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