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The Journal of African History (2003), 44:1:95-116
Alicia Campos
June 9, 2003

The demise of Spanish colonialism in Central Africa has to be understood as part of the general process of African decolonization. In accepting the methodological framework proposed by some historians for studying the collapse of European domination in the continent, we can explain the independence of Equatorial Guinea, in 1968, as a result of the interaction between three different factors: international, metropolitan and colonial. This article delineates the decolonization of the only Spanish colony south of the Sahara, its main argument being that, in the case of Equatorial Guinea, the international factor – specifically, the role of the United Nations – is fundamental to the understanding of the timing, the actors' strategies and the results.

Immo Kleinschmidt et al.
June 1, 2006

The Bioko Island Malaria Control Project was initiated in 2003 to substantially reduce malaria on the island of Bioko in Equatorial Guinea. The intervention consisted of generalized indoor residual spraying during the first year of the project. Case management and related measures were introduced during the second year. Two large household and parasitemia surveys of children 2 to < 15 years of age were carried out in 2004 and 2005, respectively, to assess the effect of the intervention after the first year. Patient records were collected retrospectively from one district hospital and analyzed for a comparison of pre-intervention and post-intervention periods. Overall mean prevalence of P. falciparum infection reduced from 46% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 40–51%) at baseline in 2004 to 31% (95% CI = 24–40%) in 2005 (P < 0.001). When the 12-month pre-intervention period was compared with the 12-month post-intervention period, there was a modest but statistically significant reduction in the number of malaria cases among hospital patients.

Filip van Dingenen
October 1, 2009

Explores the Sabater Pi Collection, which is housed at the University of Barcelona, from artist Jordi Sabater Pi. This artist had worked extensively within Equatorial Guinea and this paper examines the relationship the artist had with this region of the world.

David Casavis
October 1, 2009

Describes the obstacles that the United Nations Smallpox Eradication/Measles Control Program had in Equatorial Guinea with its vaccination program that operated within the country following its independence.

Benita Sampedro Vizcaya
October 1, 2009

Discusses the role that academia has in the recent influx of research on the country, with special emphasis given to why research is done and what are the benefits of it.

Lingua, Volume 68 (2-3)
John M Lipski
March 1, 1986

Many current theories of Hispanic dialectology implicate the influence of African phonotactic patterns on the evolution of Latin American Spanish, particularly as regards the behavior of syllable-final consonants. This study offers a unique test case which permits the separation of external phonotactic influences from the original dialectal base brought from Spain to Latin America. In this fashion, it is possible to more adequately model the interaction of phonological patterns which shaped the evolution of European languages transplanted to the Americas, since the prototype situation may in principle be extended to other language-contact environments.

African Affairs, Vol. 103, Issue 413, pp. 547-567
Geoffrey Wood
October 1, 2004

This article assesses the changing nature of the contemporary political economy of Equatorial Guinea. It provides an overview of the complex and dynamic web of elite rent-generation and explores the extent to which the development of an oil industry has contributed to a monoculture of accumulation. It is concluded that, despite the oil windfall, other, ‘illicit’, modes of elite rent-generation persist and have even intensified.

Jędrzej George Frynas
January 1, 2004

This article outlines the rise of Equatorial Guinea as one of Africa’s leading oilproducing countries and investigates the political, economic and social effects of becoming a petro-state. The article is based on the author’s field research in Equatorial Guinea in the autumn of 2003 and interviews with senior oil company staff, government officials and staff of international organizations as well as secondary sources. This research demonstrates how reliance on oil and gas exports can lead to profound changes in a country’s political economy.

Immo Kleinschmidt et al.
June 1, 2007

The Bioko Island Malaria Control Project (BIMCP) has carried out intensive interventions since early 2004 to reduce malaria transmission through indoor residual spraying (IRS) and case management. Annual parasite prevalence surveys have been carried out to monitor the effectiveness of the program. Significant overall reductions in prevalence of infection have been observed, with 42% fewer infections occurring in 2006 compared with baseline. Nevertheless, there is evidence of considerable heterogeneity in impact of the intervention. Prevalence of infection was significantly associated with spray status of the child’s house, spray coverage with effective insecticide of the neighborhood of the house, bed net use, and time elapsed since last spray. Careful scheduling of spray coverage is therefore essential to maximize the effectiveness of IRS and to ensure consistent reductions in parasite prevalence. This can only be achieved if comprehensive monitoring systems are in place for both the management and evaluation of the intervention.

Immo Kleinschmidt et al.
March 1, 2009

This article analyzes whether combining indoor residual spraying and long-lasting insecticidal nets helps curb malaria infection rates. The study concludes that combining the two methods is effective in reducing malaria infection rates.

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