Information Center: Human Rights, Press Release, 2010

10 results

Results

October 21, 2010

UNESCO Suspends Dictator Prize After Global Protest. EG Justice and its partners welcomed UNESCO’s decision to suspend the prize funded by President Obiang.

U.S. Department of State
August 30, 2010

U.S. Department of State was deeply concerned to learn that the Government of Equatorial Guinea has executed four individuals after a summary military tribunal on August 21.

United Nations Office at Geneva
August 30, 2010

This press release discusses the circumstances surrounding the execution of four Equatoguineans in Equatorial Guinea in August 2010.

August 23, 2010

EG Justice vehemently condemns the executions of Jose Abeso Nsue, Manuel Ndong Anseme, Alipio Ndong Asumu, and Jacinto Michá Obiang, carried out by the Equatoguinean government on August 21, 2010.

Amnesty International
August 22, 2010

An Amnesty International condemnation of the execution of four men in Equatorial Guinea, all convicted of attempting to assassinate the country’s President. José Abeso Nsue, Manuel Ndong Anseme, Alipio Ndong Asumu and Jacinto Michá Obiang were executed on August 21, immediately after being convicted by a military court in Malabo, the country's capital.

December 11, 2010

EG Justice and its partners submitted reports and intervened with corresponding statements at the United Nations Human Rights Council's Universal Periodic Review of Equatorial Guinea in Geneva.

September 28, 2010

The Open Society Justice Initiative has published a background paper that assesses the failure of UNESCO to screen funds from donors to prevent money laundering, as occurred with the UNESCO-Obiang prize.

July 19, 2010

The latest five-point reform package announced in a speech by President Teodoro Obiang Nguema in South Africa on June 28 purported to outline major improvements for the country and followed several comparable statements delivered in Equatorial Guinea. This package should be seen as the Obiang regime’s response to the termination of its candidate status in the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) in April and as a tacit recognition that a harsh spotlight will continue to be put on its record of corruption and repression unless it can acknowledge the need for change.

Human Rights Watch
May 9, 2010

In a joint letter to UNESCO, human rights and other civil society groups call for a full investigation into the source of the money used to fund The UNESCO-Obiang Nguema Mbasogo International Prize for Research in the Life Sciences. The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) is set to award the prize named after and funded by the dictator of Equatorial Guinea, despite pleas from hundreds of outraged individuals and organizations around the world.

Global Witness
June 28, 2010

Global Witness says that the claims of a comprehensive reform package by the president of Equatorial Guinea, Teodoro Obiang, comes across as a cynical piece of spin by a dictator more interested in lining his own pockets than tackling corruption and human rights abuses.

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