Information Center: Oil, 2009

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Results

Leung, Rebecca
August 13, 2009

News article that discusses how the increases in gas pricing in 2008 and the constant conflict in the Middle East made the United States scour the globe searching for new sources of oil (Equatoral Guinea being one of them).

Human Rights Watch
July 9, 2009

An in-depth analysis of the history and politics of Equatorial Guinea that accuses the government of Equatorial Guinea of human rights abuses, corruption, and economic mismanagement.

Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy Review, Vol. 30, Issue 1, pp. 52-100
Gavin Hilson; Roy Maconachie
January 1, 2009

This article critically examines the challenges that come with implementing the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI)—a policy mechanism marketed by donors and Western governments as a key to facilitating economic improvement in resource-rich developing countries—in sub-Saharan Africa. The forces behind the EITI contest that impoverished institutions, the embezzlement of petroleum and/or mineral revenues, and a lack of transparency are the chief reasons why resource-rich sub-Saharan Africa is under-performing economically, and that implementation of the EITI, with its foundation of “good governance,” will help address these problems. The position here, however, is that the task is by no means straightforward: that the EITI is not necessarily a blueprint for facilitating good governance in the region's resource-rich countries. It is concluded that the EITI is a policy mechanism that could prove to be effective with significant institutional change in host African countries but, on its own, it is incapable of reducing corruption and mobilizing citizens to hold government officials accountable for hoarding profits from extractive industry operations.

Peter Maass
May 8, 2009

Book written by Peter Maass, a New York Times Magazine writer, that details the corrupting influence that oil has on countries, including Equatorial Guinea.

Nicolas Donner
October 9, 2009

Analyzes the concept of the ʺoil curseʺ that is rampant in oil-rich African states. Special attention is given to this concept free from bias and other preestablished judgments.

Matthias Basedau, and Jann Lay
November 9, 2009

"The ‘resource curse’ hypothesis claims that abundance in natural resources, particularly oil, encourages especially civil war. Natural resources provide both motive and opportunity for conflict and create indirect institutional and economic causes of instability. Contrarily, the theory of the rentier suggests that regimes use revenue from abundant resources to buy off peace through patronage, large-scale distributive policies and effective repression. This article presents part of a solution to this apparent puzzle for the case of oil-producing countries. The key argument is that both resource wealth per capita and resource dependence need to be taken into account, since only the availability of very high per capita revenues from oil allows governments to achieve internal stability."

Paul Bugala
January 24, 2009

Despite increasing oil revenues, Equatorial Guinea's wealth has not directly benefited the vast majority of its people. In fact, the worsening of several indicators - such as the infant mortality rate and the status of civil liberties, in particular electoral freedom - are showing that conditions have worsened.

International Monetary Fund
March 25, 2009

Economic and social development indicators and discussions published annually by the IMF.

Adam Roberts
January 1, 2009

In 2004, Nick du Toit confessed to an attempted coup in Equatorial Guinea. But du Toit and his co-conspirators had no interest in democratic change, only in the country's oil. In this book, Adam Roberts shows how the coup is part of a new scramble for control of Africa, a continent rich in natural resources.

International Monetary Fund
March 25, 2009

An economic overview and analysis of Equatorial Guinea by the IMF.

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