Information Center: Oil, accountability

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EG Justice
Joseph Kraus
July 26, 2011

An op-ed that highlights the important role that the Dodd-Frank legislation in the U.S. could play in increasing transparency in Equatorial Guinea.

ONE
January 18, 2013

Marcelo Giugale, the World Bank's Director of Economic Policy and Poverty Reduction Programs for Africa, offers a combination of measures that every government should have in place to help citizens get a good deal from their resources.

EG Justice
August 27, 2012

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has issued final rules for legislation aimed at increasing transparency in the oil, gas, and mining industries. 

Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy Review, Vol. 30, Issue 1, pp. 52-100
Gavin Hilson; Roy Maconachie
January 1, 2009

This article critically examines the challenges that come with implementing the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI)—a policy mechanism marketed by donors and Western governments as a key to facilitating economic improvement in resource-rich developing countries—in sub-Saharan Africa. The forces behind the EITI contest that impoverished institutions, the embezzlement of petroleum and/or mineral revenues, and a lack of transparency are the chief reasons why resource-rich sub-Saharan Africa is under-performing economically, and that implementation of the EITI, with its foundation of “good governance,” will help address these problems. The position here, however, is that the task is by no means straightforward: that the EITI is not necessarily a blueprint for facilitating good governance in the region's resource-rich countries. It is concluded that the EITI is a policy mechanism that could prove to be effective with significant institutional change in host African countries but, on its own, it is incapable of reducing corruption and mobilizing citizens to hold government officials accountable for hoarding profits from extractive industry operations.

January 13, 2012

A coalition of more than 30 civil society organizations, including EG Justice, have sent a letter to every member of Congress asking them not to amend the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA).

International Monetary Fund
January 27, 2005

"Address by Agustín Carstens, Deputy Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund, at the Regional Workshop on Transparency and Accountability in Resource Management in CEMAC Countries held in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, January 27, 2005. Mr. Carstens discusses transparency, accountability, and the EITI.
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Global Witness
March 25, 2004

Governments of resource-rich developing countries often do not provide information about their revenues from natural resources, nor do multinational extractive companies publish information about payments made to the governments of those countries. Such opacity hides billions of dollars worth of financial impropriety, according to this Global Witness report.

International Budget Partnership
January 1, 2009

This brief analyzes the concept of the "resource curse" and its likely causes and effects. The interactions between political and economic factors are addressed, particularly in the context of transparency, democracy, and the management of both resources and development.

September 23, 2009

Oil, gas, and mineral companies can reduce global instability by opening the books on their payments, say investors, industry experts, and human rights advocates.

April 29, 2009

EG Justice collaborated with Publish What You Pay to produce a video that highlights the importance of revenue transparency in oil rich countries like Equatorial Guinea.

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