Information Center: Oil, Journal Articles

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Atkinson, Andrew
November 18, 2010

Report that focuses on the economy, politics and social development of Equatorial Guinea. It describes the current government, how the economy is growing, the different sectors of the economy and the different social classes that exist in Equatorial Guinea.

Quinlan, Martin

Oil production is rising and LNG production will start in a few months -- but the government wants more of the revenue and there are concerns about how it is spending it.

Tuttle, M. L.; et al.

This report was prepared as part of the World Energy Project of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Energy Resources Program. The purpose of this effort is to assess the quantities of oil, gas, and natural gas liquids that have the potential to be added to reserves within the next 30 years.

Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy Review, Vol. 30, Issue 1, pp. 52-100
Gavin Hilson; Roy Maconachie
January 1, 2009

This article critically examines the challenges that come with implementing the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI)—a policy mechanism marketed by donors and Western governments as a key to facilitating economic improvement in resource-rich developing countries—in sub-Saharan Africa. The forces behind the EITI contest that impoverished institutions, the embezzlement of petroleum and/or mineral revenues, and a lack of transparency are the chief reasons why resource-rich sub-Saharan Africa is under-performing economically, and that implementation of the EITI, with its foundation of “good governance,” will help address these problems. The position here, however, is that the task is by no means straightforward: that the EITI is not necessarily a blueprint for facilitating good governance in the region's resource-rich countries. It is concluded that the EITI is a policy mechanism that could prove to be effective with significant institutional change in host African countries but, on its own, it is incapable of reducing corruption and mobilizing citizens to hold government officials accountable for hoarding profits from extractive industry operations.

Matthias Basedau, and Jann Lay
November 9, 2009

"The ‘resource curse’ hypothesis claims that abundance in natural resources, particularly oil, encourages especially civil war. Natural resources provide both motive and opportunity for conflict and create indirect institutional and economic causes of instability. Contrarily, the theory of the rentier suggests that regimes use revenue from abundant resources to buy off peace through patronage, large-scale distributive policies and effective repression. This article presents part of a solution to this apparent puzzle for the case of oil-producing countries. The key argument is that both resource wealth per capita and resource dependence need to be taken into account, since only the availability of very high per capita revenues from oil allows governments to achieve internal stability."

The World Today, Volume 65, Number 3
Adam Roberts
March 1, 2009

An article that analyzes the alleged February 2009 coup d'etat attempt on the Presidential Palace in Malabo and the resilience of President Obiang Nguema.

Immo Kleinschmidt et al.
June 1, 2006

The Bioko Island Malaria Control Project was initiated in 2003 to substantially reduce malaria on the island of Bioko in Equatorial Guinea. The intervention consisted of generalized indoor residual spraying during the first year of the project. Case management and related measures were introduced during the second year. Two large household and parasitemia surveys of children 2 to < 15 years of age were carried out in 2004 and 2005, respectively, to assess the effect of the intervention after the first year. Patient records were collected retrospectively from one district hospital and analyzed for a comparison of pre-intervention and post-intervention periods. Overall mean prevalence of P. falciparum infection reduced from 46% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 40–51%) at baseline in 2004 to 31% (95% CI = 24–40%) in 2005 (P < 0.001). When the 12-month pre-intervention period was compared with the 12-month post-intervention period, there was a modest but statistically significant reduction in the number of malaria cases among hospital patients.

African Affairs, Vol. 103, Issue 413, pp. 547-567
Geoffrey Wood
October 1, 2004

This article assesses the changing nature of the contemporary political economy of Equatorial Guinea. It provides an overview of the complex and dynamic web of elite rent-generation and explores the extent to which the development of an oil industry has contributed to a monoculture of accumulation. It is concluded that, despite the oil windfall, other, ‘illicit’, modes of elite rent-generation persist and have even intensified.

Jędrzej George Frynas
January 1, 2004

This article outlines the rise of Equatorial Guinea as one of Africa’s leading oilproducing countries and investigates the political, economic and social effects of becoming a petro-state. The article is based on the author’s field research in Equatorial Guinea in the autumn of 2003 and interviews with senior oil company staff, government officials and staff of international organizations as well as secondary sources. This research demonstrates how reliance on oil and gas exports can lead to profound changes in a country’s political economy.

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