Information Center: Oil

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Nicholas Shaxson
July 9, 2008

Detailing the various African oil states, such as Nigeria, Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and Angola, this riveting book illuminates upon the history of oil within the African continent and the recent upsurge of key-world powers' interest in this region of the world.

International Monetary Fund
Idrissa Theim, Carlos Leite, and Andre Santos
October 5, 1999

IMF report on recent economic development in Equatorial Guinea in October 1999. The report offers data and analysis on the oil industry, non-oil industry and policy implementation.

Matthias Basedau, and Jann Lay
November 9, 2009

"The ‘resource curse’ hypothesis claims that abundance in natural resources, particularly oil, encourages especially civil war. Natural resources provide both motive and opportunity for conflict and create indirect institutional and economic causes of instability. Contrarily, the theory of the rentier suggests that regimes use revenue from abundant resources to buy off peace through patronage, large-scale distributive policies and effective repression. This article presents part of a solution to this apparent puzzle for the case of oil-producing countries. The key argument is that both resource wealth per capita and resource dependence need to be taken into account, since only the availability of very high per capita revenues from oil allows governments to achieve internal stability."

Joseph Kraus
January 9, 2010

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), as both a concept and programmatic activity, has grown rapidly. Yet despite its proliferation, there remains a lack of empirical studies that assess CSR’s ability to generate sustainable development. Proponents of CSR christen it the new development paradigm and the solution to 50 years of failed development efforts based on their view that multinational corporations are the only entities in the world with the technology, resources, capacity, and global reach necessary to effectively accomplish sustainable development. Critics, on the other hand, condemn CSR as corporate window dressing that fails to address the root causes of underdevelopment. In reality, insufficient empirical evidence of CSR efforts in developing countries exists to draw any definitive conclusions about their impacts on development. This study, drawing upon fieldwork in Equatorial Guinea, assesses the strengths and weaknesses of CSR projects implemented in a developing country context. Among other findings, this study suggests that CSR programs can represent a mechanism for pressuring recalcitrant governments to invest greater financial and human capital in social service programs, but they also can be used for public relations purposes by political regimes with poor human rights and governance records to improve their images with both international and domestic audiences.

Ken Silverstein
July 5, 2007

This article discusses how trade, investment and natural resources play a large role in determining whether dictator run countries or those with known records of human rights abuses are welcomed by the United States.

Richard B. Schmitt, and Kathleen Hennessey
July 15, 2004

This article reports on the investigation of payments made by American oil comments to the family and friends of the president of Equatorial Guinea.

Ken Silverstein
May 22, 2004

An article that reports on the ongoing investigation of American oil companies purchase of land in Equatorial Guinea at prices far above the market rate. Investigators believed these purchases may have been a method of bribing government officials in violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

Ken Silverstein
January 3, 2003

An article that assesses the large amount of revenue the government of Equatorial Guinea gains from oil money in comparison to the continued poverty of many of the nations citizens. The article also discusses the involvement of U.S. banks in supporting the Equatoguinean government's activities.

John Ghazvinian
April 9, 2007

With the advent of oil-rich African countries, this book examines the consequences that such a discovery has on the countries, while similarly detailing the extent to which kleptocracy and corruption has gripped some states. The author takes a trip into various countries, such as Equatorial Guinea, and details it within his book.

John Bolender
August 16, 2003

Article looking at US relations with Equatorial Guinea. Bolender argues the Bush administration maintains reasonably friendly relations with the African nation of Equatorial Guinea despite the extreme human rights violations perpetrated by Equatorial Guinea's government against its own people. America's motive is to acquire oil from Equatorial Guinea's vast reserves.

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