Information Center: Dissertation/Thesis

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Carlos González Echegaray

Description of the Bujeba language. Analysis of the dialect and contrast with the people who use it.

Joseph Kraus
January 9, 2010

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), as both a concept and programmatic activity, has grown rapidly. Yet despite its proliferation, there remains a lack of empirical studies that assess CSR’s ability to generate sustainable development. Proponents of CSR christen it the new development paradigm and the solution to 50 years of failed development efforts based on their view that multinational corporations are the only entities in the world with the technology, resources, capacity, and global reach necessary to effectively accomplish sustainable development. Critics, on the other hand, condemn CSR as corporate window dressing that fails to address the root causes of underdevelopment. In reality, insufficient empirical evidence of CSR efforts in developing countries exists to draw any definitive conclusions about their impacts on development. This study, drawing upon fieldwork in Equatorial Guinea, assesses the strengths and weaknesses of CSR projects implemented in a developing country context. Among other findings, this study suggests that CSR programs can represent a mechanism for pressuring recalcitrant governments to invest greater financial and human capital in social service programs, but they also can be used for public relations purposes by political regimes with poor human rights and governance records to improve their images with both international and domestic audiences.

Igor Cusack
April 5, 1999

Thesis that examines national identity in Equatorial Guinea

Gustaf Salomonsson, and Oscar Sandberg
January 25, 2010

This thesis identifies and studies the effects of the natural resource curse on Equatorial Guinea by applying three typical theoretical phenomena to the Equatoguinean context: Dutch Disease, volatility of prices and institutional effects. The results show that Equatorial Guinea has very weak institutions and suffers from symptoms of Dutch Disease, but that the country so far has managed to avoid the debt burden related to the volatility of oil prices. It is concluded that Equatorial Guinea is negatively affected by the natural resource curse. Finally, possible remedies are discussed and the importance of improving the institutional framework is underlined.

Enrique Nzang Okenve
April 2, 2009

The main thesis of this work is that political stability in Equatorial Guinea is fundamentally a result of an existing political culture characterized, among other things, by an ethos of self-repression. This political culture has made it possible for a technically and ideologically feeble regime to remain in power for three decades. In a country with a population of only half a million people, where civil society is almost non-existent; and family obligations carry a significant weight; this political culture makes any type of
political change very difficult. I will try to show how the Obiang Nguema regime has encouraged a system of societal selfrepression, which has become the most effective tool for socio-political control in Equatorial Guinea, and the fundamental obstacle to political change

US Army War College
Gabriel Metogo
March 15, 2006

This paper addresses major security and stability challenges in the Gulf of Guinea, including how the absence of peace serves as an impediment to development. Recommendations are offered regarding the best way to advance security and stability in the region surrounding the Gulf of Guinea.

Noelle Francesca Kumpel
January 1, 2006

This cross-disciplinary study considers the complex and dynamic interactions between market, hunter, and prey along an entire bushmeat chain in continental Equatorial Guinea, thus enabling evaluation of the sustainability of the system under different policy scenarios.

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