Information Center: Economy, 2004

4 results

Results

Televisíón de Catalunya, Filmakers Library, inc.
Enric Miro, Joan Salvat, Muntsa TarreÌs, Lluis Jene, Maria Josep Tubella, Ricard Belis, Ferran Pratt, Agusti Poch, Meritxell Ribas
February 2, 2004

The movie discusses the influence of the discovery of petroleum on the government and economy of Equatorial Guinea. Much of the movie analyzes the reasons why the money doesn't go to the homes and children of the poor in the country.

International Monetary Fund
Wiegand, Johannes
January 1, 2004

This paper discusses fiscal surveillance criteria for the countries of the Central African Monetary and Economic Union (CEMAC), most of which depend heavily on oil exports. At present, the CEMAC's macroeconomic surveillance exercise sets as fiscal target a floor on the basic budgetary balance. This appears inadequate, for at least two reasons. First, fluctuations in oil prices and, hence, oil receipts obscure the underlying fiscal stance. Second, oil resources are limited, which suggests that some of today's oil receipts should be saved to finance future consumption. The paper develops easy-to-calculate indicators that take both aspects into account. A retrospective analysis based on these alternative indicators reveals that in recent years, the CEMAC's surveillance exercise has tended to accommodate stances of fiscal policy that are at odds with sound management of oil wealth.

Rebecca Leung
July 18, 2004

An overview of the political and economic situation in Equatorial Guinea, with emphasis on the country's lack of social development despite its incredible wealth.

Jędrzej George Frynas
January 1, 2004

This article outlines the rise of Equatorial Guinea as one of Africa’s leading oilproducing countries and investigates the political, economic and social effects of becoming a petro-state. The article is based on the author’s field research in Equatorial Guinea in the autumn of 2003 and interviews with senior oil company staff, government officials and staff of international organizations as well as secondary sources. This research demonstrates how reliance on oil and gas exports can lead to profound changes in a country’s political economy.

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