EG Justice Launches Campaign to Fight Corruption in Equatorial Guinea

EG Justice Launches Campaign to Fight Corruption in Equatorial Guinea

August 22, 2011
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Today EG Justice launched a “Stop Corruption” campaign to expose corruption and promote transparency in Equatorial Guinea. 

(Washington, D.C., August 22, 2011)—Today EG Justice launched a “Stop Corruption” campaign to expose corruption and promote transparency in Equatorial Guinea. The campaign enables citizens to anonymously report acts of corruption to shine a light on the practices of an opaque government that Transparency International ranked as one of the world’s ten most corrupt in its 2010 Corruption Perceptions Index.  

Ongoing protests in North Africa, the Middle East, and India—sparked by citizen frustration with government corruption and secrecy—highlight the reality that citizens can successfully press for greater government accountability. 

According to Joseph Kraus, program director at EG Justice, widespread government corruption effectively robs ordinary citizens of a better future. “Corruption is a cancer that erodes citizens' confidence in their government and undermines development efforts, thereby reinforcing social inequality and perpetuating poverty. With the “Stop Corruption” campaign, both citizens of and visitors to Equatorial Guinea will for the first time have a mechanism for reporting corruption and pressuring the government for greater accountability.” 

The “Stop Corruption” campaign enables those who have experienced or witnessed corruption in Equatorial Guinea to anonymously file online complaints and post videos documenting these injustices. A continuously updated summary of received submissions, including charts and graphs, is available online. Learn more at http://egjustice.org/stop-corruption.

This campaign comes at a critical time for the citizens of Equatorial Guinea, many of whom remain mired in poverty despite the billions of dollars their government receives annually from the sale of oil and natural gas. Industry experts predict that the country’s oil reserves will run dry in 20 years, closing the window on oil-funded development. If left unchecked, corruption’s corrosive effects will hinder sustainable development efforts and waste the country’s best opportunity to eradicate poverty and diversify its economy. 

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